Pastor Scott leads an afternoon Bible School lesson on David and Goliath. The bible schools had four different activities, all following the David and Goliath theme.
Pastor Scott leads an afternoon Bible School lesson on David and Goliath. The bible schools had four different activities, all following the David and Goliath theme.

Early this fall, a group of volunteers from Colorado and Ohio came together to volunteer for two weeks of work and ministry.

They gave up the comfort of air conditioners and refrigerated foods for an opportunity to help Nicaraguan communities build a pastor’s home, hear the word of God and distribute food to needy families. The team came together through the Casa Unida Foundation, an organization focused on helping the people of Nicaragua with churches, medical needs, schools and water supply and safety needs. This year, the team went to Nicaragua with the goal of building a pastor’s home in a small community.

The time is also spent holding bible schools in local communities. The programs have lessons, activities for the children and adults, and food baskets are distributed to needy families. This year the team arrived as the region was experiencing a drought. Food staples that normally cost little skyrocketed in price. Families hopeful for a bright future after buying a cow had to sell it to meet expenses. It affected the team as well because more funds were needed to purchase the food, and the more that was given, the more need that was identified.

Sometimes the team lived the New Testament story of the five loaves and two fish. What resources were availa

Gary Kreczowski shows children how to play a David and Goliath themed game of marbles where the object is to knock the "Goliath" marble out of the center with five stones.
Gary Kreczowski shows children how to play a David and Goliath themed game of marbles where the object is to knock the “Goliath” marble out of the center with five stones.

ble were stretched to beyond their limits. The work part of the project is like applying sweat equity to ministry in another part of the world. It is not about being the most skilled. The local contractors and workers know how it works best for their region. It is about working beside them, as brothers and sisters in a common cause. The cause this year was to take an empty lot near a church the Foundation assisted with a few years ago and build a pastor’s home. The community is far enough away from the nearest city it is a challenge to recruit a pastor without a home.

The 13 or so American volunteers grew to 20 or 30 including nearby adults and children. Children barely old enough to walk and seniors who may be great-grandparents, and all ages in between helped with the removal of top soil, refilling with the proper fill process and setting of bricks. Hard work is a way of life for these people. Casa Unida teams go to assist them, not to tell them how, or to take jobs. The two-week experience ended with about half of the exterior walls raised; not a bad effort for a collection of people from students to truck drivers.

It will be completed as more people back the effort. The next trips are planned for early 2015 and July.Volunteers help build pastor’s home Early this fall, a group of volunteers from Colorado and Ohio came together to volunteer for two weeks of work and ministry. They gave up the comfort of air conditioners and refrigerated foods for an opportunity to help Nicaraguan communities build a pastor’s home, hear the word of God and distribute food to needy families. The team came together through the Casa Unida Foundation, an organization focused on helping the people of Nicaragua with churches, medical needs, schools and water supply and safety needs. This year, the team went to Nicaragua with the goal of building a pastor’s home in a small community.

The time is also spent holding bible schools in local communities. The programs have lessons, activities for the children and adults, and food baskets are distributed to needy families. This year the team arrived as the region was experiencing a drought. Food staples that normally cost little skyrocketed in price. Families hopeful for a bright future after buying a cow had to sell it to meet expenses. It affected the team as well because more funds were needed to purchase the f

American and Nicaraguan workers dig trenches where the walls will be built of the new home.
American and Nicaraguan workers dig trenches where the walls will be built of the new home.

ood, and the more that was given, the more need that was identified. Sometimes the team lived the New Testament story of the five loaves and two fish. What resources were available were stretched to beyond their limits.

The work part of the project is like applying sweat equity to ministry in another part of the world. It is not about being the most skilled. The local contractors and workers know how it works best for their region. It is about working beside them, as brothers and sisters in a common cause.

The cause this year was to take an empty lot near a church the Foundation assisted with a few years ago and build a pastor’s home. The community is far enough away from the nearest city it is a challenge to recruit a pastor without a home. The 13 or so American volunteers grew to 20 or 30 including nearby adults and children. Children barely old enough to walk and seniors who may be great-grandparents, and all age in between helped with the removal of top soil, refilling with the proper fill process and setting of bricks. Hard work is a way of life for these people.

Casa Unida teams go to assist them, not to tell them how, or to take jobs. The two-week experience ended with about half of the exterior walls raised; not a bad effort for a collection of people from students to truck drivers. It will be completed as more people back the effort. The next trips are planned for early 2015 and summer.